Two Methods to Mount an Aurora T-Jet or AFX Armature


These tips are opinion only, based on what has worked well for a particular racer over the years. Your track conditions and equipment, racing and car class rules, and personality will all influence how effective or useful these tips may be for you. There are many other effective techniques and strate gies used by others. If something here doesn't work for you, then try some thing else! Also, talk to your racing buddies, they may have a different idea that works better for you.
Be sure to see "Exploded Chassis Views." The terminology from these draw ings has been used throughout so it will be easier to visualize and under stand the procedures.

Loctite Method: Slow, little chance of part damage. No special skills required.

  1. Select a brand new armature pinion gear. (If you don't have a new gear, they can be obtained from your raceway or through a number of mail order sources.) New gears work much better than old ones; they go on straight and tight, and are much less likely to loosen over time.
  2. Sand the top of the gear with medium sandpaper; you want to roughen up the surface so the glue will stick better.
  3. Sand the arm shaft (sides and top) that will go through the gear; just roughen it up, don't remove too much material.
  4. Clean the gear and arm shaft with rubbing alcohol and let dry thoroughly. Be sure to clean out the gear hole, too. Do not touch the shaft or gear with your fingers after cleaning. Try to handle with tweezers or some other tool. If you do touch these surfaces, clean them again.
  5. Slip the arm into the gearplate and press the gear on, roughened side up. Use a small hobby vise, pliers, or small hammer. Make sure the gear is straight and the arm spins freely. Clean the top of the gear again with alco hol and let dry.
  6. Place the gearplate in a chassis and carefully apply a drop of Red Loctite #271 Threadlocker to the top of the gear. Do not use anything else! Super Glue, Epoxy, Black Max, JB Weld, or any other Loctite numbered product won't work! Try to cover the entire gear, but don't get any in the teeth.
  7. Place the gearplate and chassis upright and level in a warm location and let it sit undisturbed for at least 2 days, longer if you have the time.
  8. After it has dried thoroughly, do the "Twist Check." Hold the pinion between two fingers of one hand and the arm between two fingers of the other hand. Slowly begin to twist the arm against the pinion, gradually increasing the force. If you can break it loose fairly easily by hand, then chances are it wouldn't have survived under racing conditions (better to find this out at home, rather than in the middle of a heat). If it holds until the pin ion teeth begin to dig a little into your fingers, than it's probably OK. "Twist Check" all re-mounted arms before every race, too, and have some legal backup motors selected and readily accessible, just in case. NOTE: Please don't use too much strength when doing the "Twist Check", `cause then you will break the gear loose! Use just enough force to ensure that a good joint has been made. This is something you will just have to experiment with and get a "feeling" for.

Soldering Method: Instant, but with risk of part damage. Good soldering skills required

  1. Select a brand new armature pinion gear. (If you don't have a new gear, they can be obtained from your raceway or from a number of mail order sources.) New gears work much better than old ones; they go on straight and tight, and are much less likely to loosen over time.
  2. Sand the top of the gear with medium sandpaper; you want to roughen up the surface so the solder will stick better.
  3. Sand the arm shaft (sides and top) that will go through the gear; just roughen it up, don't remove too much material.
  4. Slip the arm into the gearplate and press the gear on, roughened side up. Use a small hobby vise, pliers, or small hammer. Make sure the gear is straight and the arm spins freely.
  5. Place the gearplate in a scrap chassis and solder the gear on. Use a small soldering tip and a little soldering paste. Use thin, 2% silver content solder if you can find it. Apply heat at the center of the gear near the arm shaft to keep solder away from teeth. Use just a touch of solder and pull the heat away immediately when it begins to flow. Don't overheat! You may ruin the chassis and the arm!
  6. Clean up any paste residue, place the idler gear back in and check the mesh. If you got solder in the teeth, scrape it out with a hobby knife.
  7. After cooling, do the "Twist Check." Hold the pinion between two fingers of one hand and the arm between two fingers of the other hand. Slowly begin to twist the arm against the pinion, gradually increasing the force. If you can break it loose fairly easily by hand, then chances are it wouldn't have sur vived under racing conditions (better to find this out at home, rather than in the middle of a heat). If it holds until the pinion teeth begin to dig a little into your fingers, than it's probably OK. "Twist Check" all re-mounted arms before every race, too, and have some legal backup motors selected and readily accessible, just in case. NOTE: Please don't use too much strength when doing the "Twist Check", `cause then you will break the gear loose! Use just enough force to ensure that a good joint has been made. This is something you will just have to experiment with and get a "feeling" for.

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